Posts Tagged ‘esstech’

PRODUCT SPOTLIGHT: HEMA Maleate

Friday, November 11th, 2011
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Item Code: X-846-0000X-846-0000, HEMA Maleate

Product Name: Methacryloyloxyethyl Maleate
CAS#: 51978-15-5

EINECS(I): 257-569-5
INCI: HEMA Maleate

HEMA maleate is a carboxylic acid-containing methacrylate that can function as an alternative to PMDM. It has been used in anaerobic adhesive applications and is approved for use in cosmetic products.

The carboxylic acid group of X-846-0000 has the ability to improve adhesion to keratin.  Its’ monomethacrylate functionality allows it to be incorporated into soak-off systems without detriment to “removability”.  HEMA maleate’s low viscosity also makes it an ideal, reactive diluents.

Contact us directly to discuss your application and request samples, techsupport@esstechinc.com.


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Urethane Dimethacrylate used in Rapid Prototyping Application

Thursday, October 13th, 2011
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Characterization of a nanoparticle-filled resin for application in scan-LED-technology

Eva Kolb, Claudia Kummerlöwe and Martin Klare

Volume 22, Number 10, 2165-2173, DOI: 10.1007/s10856-011-4411-7

Abstract

Scan-LED-technology is a new rapid prototyping technique with increasing applications in the production of custom-made medical products. The present work is dealing with the examination of a silica/urethandimethacrylate (UDMA) nanocomposite for application in scan-LED-technology. The use of specific LED in a photo-DSC unit enables the simulation of crucial parameters of nanoparticle-filled resins for their application in scan-LED-technology. The conversion of double bonds during the curing reaction and the rate of conversion were studied as a function of radiation intensity, silica nanoparticle content, and silanization of the nanoparticles with 3-methacryloyloxypropyl-trimethoxysilane (MPTMS). The conversion of double bonds is increasing with increasing radiation intensity. The increasing conversion of the nanoparticle-filled resins is discussed as a combined effect of increasing nanoparticle content, alternated initiator/double bond ratio and increasing radiation intensity. A significant dependence of the reaction rate on nanoparticle content could not be found. Only for the unfilled resin, the rate was increasing at higher radiation intensities. The influence of residual solvent on conversion and rate of reaction was also analyzed. TGA measurements combined with FTIR were used to study the silanization of the nanoparticles. The silane layer thickness on the surface of the silica nanoparticles was determined.
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Introducing EXOTHANE Elastomers

Wednesday, September 28th, 2011
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EXOTHANE Elastomers

Optimize Photocurable Mechanical Properties

EXOTHANE™ Elastomers represent the most recent advances in Esstech’s urethane chemistry. These versatile materials offer performance enhancements across a broad range of demanding formulations.

  • Exothane 8, low color urethane, creates a “soft” yet tough polymer with high elongation
  • Exothane 26, high flexibility when cured, has the ability to re-adhere at lower tensile strength
  • Exothane 24, high crosslink capacity, low in color and viscosity and very high Shore D hardness
  • Exothane 32, very low in color and viscosity, provides improved flexibility

Like many of Esstech’s other products, potential applications involving EXOTHANE™ Elastomers can vary across many industries from medical devices and nail gel enhancements to radiation-curable coatings.

Contact us directly to discuss your unique requirements and request our EXOTHANE™ Elastomers Product Literature.

Phone: 1-800-245-3800 or 610-521-3800
EMail: techsupport@esstechinc.com.

Esstech products are available to our European customers via, Esschem Europe

(www.esschem-europe.com).



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Esstech Attending UV.EB East

Wednesday, September 21st, 2011
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Esstech will be attending the UV.EB East Show in Syracuse, NY from October 4th to the 5th.

We look forward to seeing everyone, making appointments and discussing our new EXOTHANE(TM) Elastomers product line .

If you would like to schedule a meeting with use, please send an email to techsupport@esstechinc.com.


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Esstech Achieves OSHA-SHARP Recognition

Friday, August 12th, 2011
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Esstech has again, re-qualified for the Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program or SHARP.  SHARP is an OSHA cooperative program that recognizes companies who operate an exemplary safety and health management system.  Click here the logo to learn more about this achievement.


OSHA-SHARP



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FIT 852 Shrinkage / Conversion Data

Thursday, July 28th, 2011
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Click on the following link for a pdf download of our poster.

Physical Properties of a New Low Shrink Resin

A. JOHNSTON1, F. RUEGGEBERG2, H.R. RAWLS3, H. SLAFF1, T. BARCLIFT1, and J. DUFF1, 1Esstech Inc, Essington, PA, 2Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA, 3University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX

Introduction:

The improvement of aesthetic restorative dental composites can be pursued on many fronts. A composite is made from multiple components but, generally, it is a blend of finely ground glasses and reactive monomers.  The monomers cure to provide a continuous polymer matrix for retaining the glass.  Together they present a hard surface with the capability to survive in the oral environment.  Failure of these composites is a complex phenomenon.   While clinical failure can occur when the adhesive force between the composite and the vital dental tissue is compromised, failure also occurs when stresses overcome the cohesive strength of the continuous phase of the mixture.   Catastrophic material failure can occur as wear against complementary dentition that slowly erodes the surface.   Those cracks through the polymer phase lead to composite failure.  To improve the composite properties, a new monomer has been introduced, FIT 852 Resin™, that can provide greater toughness in the polymer, greater extent of cure in the polymer, lower shrinkage stress and no change in composite material manufacture.


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X-726-0000, Suitable HEMA Replacement

Tuesday, July 5th, 2011
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A new approach in self-etching adhesive formulations: Replacing HEMA for surfactant dimethacrylate monomers

Cesar Henrique Zanchi,, Eliseu Aldrighi Münchow, Fabricio Aulo Ogliari, Rodrigo Varella de Carvalho, Stefano Chersoni, Carlo Prati, Flávio Fernando Demarco, Evandro Piva

Article first published online: 28 JUN 2011.  DOI: 10.1002/jbm.b.31871. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2011.

Abstract

This study evaluated the influence of surfactant dimethacrylates (SD) on the resin-to-dentin microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and characterized the interfacial micromorphology of the hybrid layer of the experimental HEMA-free self-etching systems. Five experimental HEMA-free two-step self-etching systems containing different SD (Bis-EMA 10, Bis-EMA 30, PEG 400, PEG 1000, and PEG 400 UDMA [Esstech Code X-726-0000]) and a HEMA-containing system (control) were compared. Each experimental adhesive system was applied and resin composite restorations were incrementally built up in bovine incisors. After 24 h, restored teeth were sectioned to obtain 24 sticks per group. Thereafter, the specimens were subjected to the μTBS test. Data (MPa) were analyzed by One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Adhesive-dentin interfaces were analyzed through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The adhesive system formulated with PEG 400 UDMA produced μTBS similar to the HEMA-containing group and statistically higher than the HEMA-free groups. Similar failure percentages were observed in the PEG 400 UDMA and the control group. In the SEM analysis, all the adhesive systems presented similar partially demineralized hybrid layer (1.5–3.0 μm thickness) with well-formed resin tags. All SD presented reasonable initial μTBS, with the PEG 400 UDMA being a promising monomer to be considered as a HEMA substitute in adhesive systems compositions.


Link:  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jbm.b.31871/full

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BisGMA – UDMA Composite with Nanosilica Fibers

Tuesday, March 29th, 2011
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Synthesis of Nanosilica Fillers for Experimental Dental Nanocomposites and Their Characterisations
Tuan Noraihan Azila Tuan Rahim1, Dasmawati Mohamad1*, Abdul Rashid Ismail1 and Hazizan Md Akil2

1School of Dental Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia,
2School of Material and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia

MATERIALS:

Tetraethyorthosilicate (TEOS), absolute ethanol, ammonia,  γ-methacryloxypropyl-trimethoxysilane (γ-MPS), acetic acid (CH3COOH), bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (BisGMA, Esstech), diurethane dimethacrylate (UDMA), triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA), camphorquinone (CQ), (2-dimethylaminoethyl) methacrylate (DMAEMA) and distilled water were used in this work. The chemicals were employed without any further purification.

ABSTRACT:

The aim of this study was to synthesise nanosilica fillers for use in the fabrication of experimental dental nanocomposites and to evaluate their properties,  including surface and mechanical properties. Monodispersed, spherical silica nanoparticles were synthesised via a sol-gel process, and a size range of 10–20 nm was obtained. Surface treatment of the nanosilica was carried out with the silane coupling agent γ-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) to reduce agglomeration of nanosilica. Experimental dental nanocomposites with two different filler contents, 30 and 35 wt%, were fabricated and polymerised with a light curing unit for 40 s. The surface morphology, surface roughness, flexural strength and elastic modulus were evaluated and compared. A nanocomposite with 35% filler content showed higher filler compaction, lower surface roughness and higher elastic modulus than a nanocomposite filled with 30% filler. However, the nanocomposite filled with 30% filler content showed higher flexural strength. Based on the results obtained, the synthesised nanosilica is a promising material for the fabrication of dental nanocomposites for tooth-filling applications.



LINK:  http://web.usm.my/jps/22-1-11/22.1.6.pdf


Journal of Physical Science, Vol. 22(1), 93–105, 2011
© Penerbit Universiti Sains Malaysia, 2011

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4-META History and Applications

Tuesday, October 19th, 2010
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4-META use in dentistry:  A literature review

Jeffrey Chai Chang, DDS, MS, Thomas L. Hurst, DDS, MS, Deborah A. Hart, DMD, and Allan W. Estey, DDSd.  University of Texas Dental Branch, and V.A. Medical Center, Houston, Texas

(J Prosthet Dent 2002;87:216-24.)

ABSTRACT:
4-META (4-methacryloyloxyethy trimellitate anhydride) adhesive resins have been reported in the dental literature for more than 20 years. While the majority of available bonding agents available have gone through changes from the first generation to the fifth, 4-META products have had basically the same ingredients since inception. They consistently produce excellent results, are easy to use, and are not technique-sensitive. Some new adhesive products may have higher bond strengths, but the optimum strength for adhesive materials has not been determined clinically.  For ease of use and consistency of results, 4-META adhesive resins appear to be a good choice.

LINK: http://www.prosdent.org/article/S0022-3913%2802%2961035-2/abstract


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Effect of Varying Filler Content in BisGMA:TEGDMA Composites

Friday, September 10th, 2010
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Contraction stress related to composite inorganic content

F. Gonçalvesa, Y. Kawanob, R.R. Bragaa

Dental Materials Volume 26, Issue 7, Pages 704-709 (July 2010).

Objectives: The role of inorganic content on physical properties of resin composites is well known. However, its influence on polymerization stress development has not been established. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the influence of inorganic fraction on polymerization stress and its determinants, namely, volumetric shrinkage, elastic modulus and degree of conversion.

Methods: Eight experimental composites containing 1:1 BisGMA (bisphenylglycidyl dimethacrylate):TEGDMA (triethylene glycol dimethacrylate) (in mol) and barium glass at increasing concentrations from 25 to 60vol.% (5% increments) were tested. Stress was determined in a universal test machine using acrylic as bonding substrate. Nominal polymerization stress was obtained diving the maximum load by the cross-surface area. Shrinkage was measured using a water picnometer. Elastic modulus was obtained by three-point flexural test. Degree of conversion was determined by FT-Raman spectroscopy.

Results: Polymerization stress and shrinkage showed inverse relationships with filler content (R2=0.965 and R2=0.966, respectively). Elastic modulus presented a direct correlation with inorganic content (R2=0.984). Degree of conversion did not vary significantly. Polymerization stress showed a strong direct correlation with shrinkage (R2=0.982) and inverse with elastic modulus (R2=0.966).

Significance: High inorganic contents were associated with low polymerization stress values, which can be explained by the reduced volumetric shrinkage presented by heavily filled composites.

Link:  http://www.demajournal.com/article/PIIS0109564110000801/fulltext


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