Posts Tagged ‘Resin’

Product Spotlight: “Solid” Urethanes

Wednesday, November 28th, 2012
Share This Post!

In our pursuit of new and innovative materials, Esstech has created an experimental line of “solid” urethanes.  These materials are solid at room temperature, resembling glass both in appearance and the ability to fracture easily into a powder upon impact.  Here are more of our initial observations:

  • Easy to incorporate into a powder coating once fractured.
  • Extrude well under normal conditions and can be ground, sieved or sprayed.
  • Create very clear and colorless coatings.
  • Cured materials have excellent solvent resistance, flexibility and adhesion to polycarbonate and ABS.

 

Esstech offers a multitude of monomers including acrylates, methacrylates, diluents, crosslinkers, oligomers and more!  Contact us to discuss sourcing of existing commercial products or custom development.

.

Contact us to request samples and/or additional information regarding any of our products.
.
.
.
Sign up for our Monthly Email Update summarizing all new posts to Esstechinc.com, CLICK HERE
.
.
.

 


Share This Post!

Product Spotlight: 70:30 BisGMA:TEGDMA

Friday, November 9th, 2012
Share This Post!

By popular demand, Esstech now offers a mixture of 70% BisGMA and 30% TEGDMA.  Click on the following links to learn more about our commercial blends:

 

Esstech offers a multitude of monomers including acrylates, methacrylates, diluents, crosslinkers, oligomers and more!  Contact us to discuss sourcing of any material or custom blends to match your application.  With large volume and high shear capability, there is a very good chance that Esstech can create a blend just right for you.

.

Contact us to request samples and/or additional information regarding any of our products.
.
.
.
Sign up for our Monthly Email Update summarizing all new posts to Esstechinc.com, CLICK HERE

 

 


Share This Post!

LOW SHRINK, HIGH CONVERSION

Friday, November 11th, 2011
Share This Post!

EXOTHANE Elastomers

Do not sacrifice conversion and the risk of residual monomer contamination to achieve low-shrink properties.  New testing has demonstrated that EXOTHANE(TM) Elastomers have low shrinkage stress, low volumetric shrinkage, AND high conversion.

  • Exothane 8, 94% Conversion, 3% Shrinkage, high % elongation
  • Exothane 26, 96% Conversion, 4% Shrinkage, increased flexibility/toughness
  • Exothane 32, 97% Conversion, 3% Shrinkage, low color and low viscosity

This new data, in addition to superior toughness, tensilse strength and percent elongation make the EXOTHANE product line ideal form many applications including, low-shrink dental restoratives, non-curling industrial coatings, unique UV nail enhancements, tougher anaerobic adhesives and more.


Sign up for our Monthly Email Update summarizing all new posts to Esstechinc.com, CLICK HERE.


Share This Post!

Novel CAD-CAM Blocks Increase Load-Bearing Capacity of Dental Prostheses

Tuesday, September 6th, 2011
Share This Post!

Load-bearing capacity of handmade and computer-aided design–computer-aided manufacturing-fabricated three-unit fixed dental prostheses of particulate filler composite

Authors: Gööncüü Başşaran, Emine; Ayna, Emrah; Vallittu, Pekka K.; Lassila, Lippo V. J.


Overview: The load-bearing capacity of traditional CAD-CAM fabricated dental prostheses was significantly increased through the formulation of novel blocks incorporating dimethacrylate resins and silanated glass from Esstech Inc.


Objectives: To compare handmade and computer-aided design–computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM)-fabricated fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) composed of a particulate filler composite.

Materials and Methods: Handmade FDPs were made of restorative composite (Z 100) and CAD-CAM-fabricated FDPs were made of commercial CAD-CAM blocks (VITA Temp) and two experimental CAD-CAM blocks of particulate filler composite. Experimental CAD composite A was prepared by mixing 31.2 wt.% of dimethacrylate resin with 68.7 wt.% of filler particles of barium oxide silicate (BaSiO2). Experimental CAD composite B was prepared by mixing 25.6 wt.% of dimethacrylate resin with 74.3 wt.% of filler particles of BaSiO2. Six groups were fabricated (n == 6 in each); FDPs were statically loaded until final fracture.

Results: Experimental CAD composites A and B revealed the highest load-bearing capacity of the FDPs, while Z 100 showed the lowest.

Conclusion: FDPs made of experimental CAD composite blocks showed higher load-bearing capacities than handmade commercial composites and commercial blocks.


Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, Volume 69, Number 3, May 2011 , pp. 144-150(7)

DOI: 10.3109/00016357.2010.545034


Sign up for our Monthly Email Update summarizing all new posts to Esstechinc.com, CLICK HERE.





Share This Post!

Free Download of FIT 852 Data

Thursday, December 16th, 2010
Share This Post!

Click on the following link for a pdf download of our IADR 2010 poster.

Physical Properties of a New Low Shrink Resin

A. JOHNSTON1, F. RUEGGEBERG2, H.R. RAWLS3, H. SLAFF1, T. BARCLIFT1, and J. DUFF1, 1Esstech Inc, Essington, PA, 2Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA, 3University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX

Introduction:

The improvement of esthetic restorative dental composites can be pursued on many fronts. A composite is made from multiple components but, generally, it is a blend of finely ground glasses and reactive monomers.  The monomers cure to provide a continuous polymer matrix for retaining the glass.  Together they present a hard surface with the capability to survive in the oral environment.  Failure of these composites is a complex phenomenon.   While clinical failure can occur when the adhesive force between the composite and the vital dental tissue is compromised, failure also occurs when stresses overcome the cohesive strength of the continuous phase of the mixture.   Catastrophic material failure can occur as wear against complementary dentition that slowly erodes the surface.   Those cracks through the polymer phase lead to composite failure.  To improve the composite properties, a new monomer has been introduced, FIT 852 Resin™, that can provide greater toughness in the polymer, greater extent of cure in the polymer, lower shrinkage stress and no change in composite material manufacture.


To learn more about this and other exciting products from Esstech, sign-up for our monthly e-mail update.  Click Here!



Share This Post!

An Overview of Esstech, Inc.

Tuesday, August 10th, 2010
Share This Post!


Share This Post!

Esstech to detail FIT 852 at IADR 2010 Barcelona

Wednesday, June 30th, 2010
Share This Post!


Share This Post!

UDMA – TEGDMA Viable Resin System for Chlorhexidine Release

Thursday, June 17th, 2010
Share This Post!

Controlled Release of Chlorhexidine from UDMA-TEGDMA Resin

K.J. Anusavice, N.-Z. Zhang and C. Shen

J DENT RES 2006; 85; 950

ABSTRACT
Chlorhexidine salts are available in various formulations for dental applications. This study tested the hypothesis that the release of chlorhexidine from a urethane dimethacrylate and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate resin system can be effectively controlled by the chlorhexidine diacetate content and pH. The filler concentrations were 9.1, 23.1, or 33.3 wt%, and the filled resins were exposed to pH 4 and pH 6 acetate buffers. The results showed that Fickian diffusion was the dominant release mechanism. The rates of release were significantly higher in pH 4 buffer, which was attributed to the increase of chlorhexidine diacetate solubility at lower pH. The higher level of filler loading reduced the degree of polymerization, leading to a greater loss of organic components and higher chlorhexidine release rates.

Link:  http://jdr.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/85/10/950


Share This Post!

Esstech to Present at IADR 2010

Wednesday, April 28th, 2010
Share This Post!

We are very excited to announce the details of our 2010 IADR presentation!

Physical Properties of New Low-Shrink Resin

Friday, July 16, 2010: 3 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Location: Exhibit Hall (CCIB)
A. JOHNSTON1, F. RUEGGEBERG2, H.R. RAWLS3, H. SLAFF1, T. BARCLIFT1, and J. DUFF1, 1Esstech Inc, Essington, PA, 2Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA, 3University of Texas Health Science Ctr at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX

2010 IADR Meeting Logo


Share This Post!

Refractive Index of Methacrylate Monomers & Polymers

Thursday, March 11th, 2010
Share This Post!

TECHNICAL BULLETIN:  Refractive Index of Monomers and Their Respective Polymers

The refractive index (RI) of photopolymers is an essential property for many applications.  For optical and coating applications, the RI can be related to the resultant gloss or clarity upon cure.  Within the dental industry, the refractive index of the organic polymer matrix, must match that of the inorganic filler and substrate in order to avoid obvious “lines” where the product is applied.

Various factors affect refractive index values.  The presence of conjugated ring structures contributes to increasing RI.  In general, larger molecular weight monomers have a tendency to possess a higher RI in comparison to their lower molecular weight counterparts.  Similar to this trend, high molecular weight functional groups like methacrylates have higher RI than their acrylate counterparts. Higher atomic weight atoms also seem to be predisposed to having higher RI.

Recognizing the importance of refractive index to our customers, Esstech has assembled RI data for a portion of our existing monomer products as well as their corresponding homopolymers.

 Esstech Refractive Index Chart

Maintaining its position as an industry innovator, Esstech has also created functional, high refractive index materials.  Contact us to learn more about these novel materials and how Esstech can make a material to match your application.

 (P) 800-245-3800 / (P) 610-521-3800 / techsupport@esstechinc.com / www.esstechinc.com


Share This Post!

Esstech Inc. – Creating custom products & formulations to meet your unique needs!