Posts Tagged ‘dental research’

Esstech to Attend IDS 2013, Cologne

Monday, October 29th, 2012
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 IDS 2013, Cologne, Germany

 

It is our pleasure to attend the 35th International Dental Show in Cologne from March 12th to the 16th.

We look forward to seeing everyone.  Contact us to schedule an appointment at techsupport@esstechinc.com .

 

 

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Esstech Presents Exothanes at AADR

Wednesday, February 15th, 2012
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Join us in Tampa, FL for the AADR Annual Meeting, March 21-24.

We are excited to present our poster highlighting the latest shrinkage and conversion data of our EXOTHANE Elastomers.  Contact us immediately to schedule a meeting.

Hope to see you there!

Phone:  1-800-245-3800 or 610-521-3800

EMail: techsupport@esstechinc.com.
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New Additions to the Esstech Team

Wednesday, January 11th, 2012
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From its simple origins in the early 1990’s as a line of highly customized raw materials for compounders of “new generation” restorative dental composites to now a major manufacturer of customized UV/EB curable materials serving an ever-wider range of industries, Esstech, Inc. has indeed been a very successful “experiment”.  It is my pleasure to announce two additions to the Esstech Team of talented professionals.


Last year, Bruce Farina, a 21-year veteran of Sartomer Company, joined Esstech as Senior Vice President and we are now pleased to announce that, effective as of January 1, 2012, Bruce has been given full operational responsibility for Esstech as President/COO.  Bruce’s two decades of experience at Sartomer ranged from Manufacturing Manager through various titles and functions to Vice President with, most recently, overall global responsibility for all of Sartomer’s photocure (UV/EB) business.


Bruce is taking over for Howard Slaff who, after a very successful leadership tenure at Esstech, is moving ten miles south down I-95 to assume the President/COO responsibilities being vacated by the retiring Mike Norquist at Esstech’s sister company, Esschem, Inc..


I am also very pleased to announce that Bruce has successfully recruited Dr. Mike Idacavage as Esstech’s new Director of Business Development.  Mike Idacavage may be known to some of you as the immediate past-President of RadTech North America and is a lifetime member of RadTech’s Board of Directors.  Mike’s “day job” for the last 15 years was with Cytec Industries (and, pre-merger, UCB Chemicals), most recently as Cytec’s Principal Research Fellow.


Those of us involved with Esstech over the years could not be more excited with the Team now in place and with their commitment to its next phase of customer-centric growth!


Please check us out at www.esstechinc.com !

Henry M. (“Tac”) Justi
Chairman

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TPO Evaluated in Dental Composites

Monday, January 9th, 2012
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Curing efficiency of dental resin composites formulated with camphorquinone or trimethylbenzoyl-diphenyl-phosphine oxide

Luis Felipe J. Schneider, Larissa Maria Cavalcante, Scott A. Prah, Carmem S. Pfeifer, Jack L. Ferracane.  “Curing efficiency of dental resin composites formulated with camphorquinone or trimethylbenzoyl-diphenyl-phosphine oxide” Dental Materials.  December 2011:  Online

Summary:

This research presents trimethylbenzoyl-diphenyl-phosphine oxide (TPO) as an alternative to camphorquinone (CQ) photoinitiator systems for dental resins.  An immediate advantage is the low color of TPO in comparison to the strong yellow color of CQ. Testing using a spectrophotometer and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) revealed that TPO had higher reactivity than CQ.  CQ exhibited higher absorbed power density, (PDabs) and better depth of cure.

Materials

Testing of each photoinitiator was performed using 50:50 formulations of 2,2-bis[4-2(2-hydroxy-3-
methacroyloxypropoxy)phenyl]propane (Bis-GMA, Esstech) and triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA, Esstech).


LINK:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dental.2011.11.014

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Esstech Attending CIOSP 2012

Monday, December 5th, 2011
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Join us in Sau Paulo for the CIOSP dental show, January 28-31.

We are planning a very exciting and busy trip so contact us immediately to schedule a meeting.

Hope to see you there!


Phone:  1-800-245-3800 or 610-521-3800
EMail:  techsupport@esstechinc.com
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Optimized LED cure of BisGMA:TEGDMA

Thursday, December 1st, 2011
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Micro-Raman spectroscopic analysis of the degree of conversion of composite resins containing different initiators cured by polywave or monowave LED units

Vesna Miletic a, Ario Santini b,

a Clinical Lecturer, University of Belgrade, School of Dentistry, Department of Restorative Odontology and Endodontics, Rankeova 4, Belgrade, Serbia

b Director of Biomaterials Research, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh Postgraduate Dental Institute, Lauriston Place, Edinburgh EH3 9HA, United Kingdom

Received 20 August 2011; revised 28 October 2011; Accepted 30 October 2011. Available online 6 November 2011.

Objectives

To determine the degree of conversion (DC) over 48 h post-curing of resin mixtures containing trimethylbenzoyl-diphenylphosphine oxide (TPO) initiator cured by a polywave or a monowave LED light-curing unit (LCU).

Methods

In resin mixtures based on equal weight percent (wt%) of BisGMA and TEGDMA the following initiators were added: 0.2wt% camphorquinone (CQ) + 0.8wt% ethyl-4-dimethylaminobenzoate (EDMAB) (Group 1); 1wt% TPO (Group 2) and 0.1wt% CQ + 0.4wt% EDMAB + 0.5wt% TPO (Group 3). Half of the samples in each group (n = 5) were cured using a polywave (bluephase® G2, Ivoclar Vivadent) or a monowave LED LCU (bluephase®, Ivoclar Vivadent). The DC was measured using micro-Raman spectroscopy within 5 min and then 1, 3, 6, 24 and 48 h post-irradiation. The data were analyzed using general linear model and two-way ANOVA for the factors ‘time’, ‘material’, ‘surface’ and ‘LCU’ at α=0.05.

Results

The initial DC values obtained upon light curing remained similar over a 48 h period. bluephase® G2 produced the highest DC in Group 2 followed by Group 3, and Group 1. bluephase® resulted in the highest DC in Group 1, followed by Group 2 and Group 3 (p < 0.05).

Conclusions

Unfilled resin materials containing both TPO- and CQ-amine initiators are effectively cured using bluephase® G2. Resin mixture with the same wt% of initiators is better cured when TPO is the only initiator, compared to CQ-amine only or combined TPO and CQ-amine system. After initial light cure, no additional conversion of uncured monomers was detected in an unfilled resin material over 48 h at 37 °C.

Materials

Page 5 of 24 Ac ce pte d M an usc rip t 4 Materials and Methods The following materials were
used in the study: bisphenol A bis(2-bydroxy-3- methacryloxypropyl)ether (BisGMA), triethylene
glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA)
, camphorquinone (CQ) (Esstech Inc, Essington, PA


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LOW SHRINK, HIGH CONVERSION

Friday, November 11th, 2011
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EXOTHANE Elastomers

Do not sacrifice conversion and the risk of residual monomer contamination to achieve low-shrink properties.  New testing has demonstrated that EXOTHANE(TM) Elastomers have low shrinkage stress, low volumetric shrinkage, AND high conversion.

  • Exothane 8, 94% Conversion, 3% Shrinkage, high % elongation
  • Exothane 26, 96% Conversion, 4% Shrinkage, increased flexibility/toughness
  • Exothane 32, 97% Conversion, 3% Shrinkage, low color and low viscosity

This new data, in addition to superior toughness, tensilse strength and percent elongation make the EXOTHANE product line ideal form many applications including, low-shrink dental restoratives, non-curling industrial coatings, unique UV nail enhancements, tougher anaerobic adhesives and more.


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Novel CAD-CAM Blocks Increase Load-Bearing Capacity of Dental Prostheses

Tuesday, September 6th, 2011
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Load-bearing capacity of handmade and computer-aided design–computer-aided manufacturing-fabricated three-unit fixed dental prostheses of particulate filler composite

Authors: Gööncüü Başşaran, Emine; Ayna, Emrah; Vallittu, Pekka K.; Lassila, Lippo V. J.


Overview: The load-bearing capacity of traditional CAD-CAM fabricated dental prostheses was significantly increased through the formulation of novel blocks incorporating dimethacrylate resins and silanated glass from Esstech Inc.


Objectives: To compare handmade and computer-aided design–computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM)-fabricated fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) composed of a particulate filler composite.

Materials and Methods: Handmade FDPs were made of restorative composite (Z 100) and CAD-CAM-fabricated FDPs were made of commercial CAD-CAM blocks (VITA Temp) and two experimental CAD-CAM blocks of particulate filler composite. Experimental CAD composite A was prepared by mixing 31.2 wt.% of dimethacrylate resin with 68.7 wt.% of filler particles of barium oxide silicate (BaSiO2). Experimental CAD composite B was prepared by mixing 25.6 wt.% of dimethacrylate resin with 74.3 wt.% of filler particles of BaSiO2. Six groups were fabricated (n == 6 in each); FDPs were statically loaded until final fracture.

Results: Experimental CAD composites A and B revealed the highest load-bearing capacity of the FDPs, while Z 100 showed the lowest.

Conclusion: FDPs made of experimental CAD composite blocks showed higher load-bearing capacities than handmade commercial composites and commercial blocks.


Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, Volume 69, Number 3, May 2011 , pp. 144-150(7)

DOI: 10.3109/00016357.2010.545034


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FIT 852 Shrinkage / Conversion Data

Thursday, July 28th, 2011
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Click on the following link for a pdf download of our poster.

Physical Properties of a New Low Shrink Resin

A. JOHNSTON1, F. RUEGGEBERG2, H.R. RAWLS3, H. SLAFF1, T. BARCLIFT1, and J. DUFF1, 1Esstech Inc, Essington, PA, 2Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA, 3University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX

Introduction:

The improvement of aesthetic restorative dental composites can be pursued on many fronts. A composite is made from multiple components but, generally, it is a blend of finely ground glasses and reactive monomers.  The monomers cure to provide a continuous polymer matrix for retaining the glass.  Together they present a hard surface with the capability to survive in the oral environment.  Failure of these composites is a complex phenomenon.   While clinical failure can occur when the adhesive force between the composite and the vital dental tissue is compromised, failure also occurs when stresses overcome the cohesive strength of the continuous phase of the mixture.   Catastrophic material failure can occur as wear against complementary dentition that slowly erodes the surface.   Those cracks through the polymer phase lead to composite failure.  To improve the composite properties, a new monomer has been introduced, FIT 852 Resin™, that can provide greater toughness in the polymer, greater extent of cure in the polymer, lower shrinkage stress and no change in composite material manufacture.


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Esstech Resins in Antibacterial Nanocomposite

Monday, July 11th, 2011
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Development of an antimicrobial resin—A pilot study

Catherine Fan, Lianrui Chu, H. Ralph Rawls, Barry K. Norling, Hector L. Cardenas, Kyumin Whang

Dental Materials.  Volume 27, Issue 4, Pages 322-328 (April 2011)

Summary

To demonstrate that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) could be synthesized in situ in acrylic dental resins.

Methods: Light-cure (LC; bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate, tetraethyleneglycol dimethacrylate, bisphenol A ethoxylate dimethacrylate blend) and chemical-cure systems (CC; orthodontic denture resin) were used to synthesize AgNPs using different concentrations of Ag benzoate (AgBz).

Results: Rockwell hardness for LC resins showed that resins could be cured with up to 0.15% AgBz, while the hardness of CC resins were unaffected in the concentrations tested. UV–Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of AgNPs in both LC and CC resins. Generally, CC resins had better distribution of and much smaller AgNPs as compared to LC resins overall. In some samples, especially in LC resins, nanoclusters were visible. An in vitro release study over four-weeks showed that CC resins released the most Ag+ ions, with release detected in all samples. However, LC resins only released Ag+ ions when AgBz concentration was greater than 0.1% (w/w). AgNP-loaded CC resins made with 0.2 and 0.5% (w/w) AgBz were tested for antibacterial activity in vitro against Streptococcus mutans, and results showed 52.4% and a 97.5% bacterial inhibition, respectively. Further work is now warranted to test mechanical properties and to optimize the initiator system to produce commercially useful dental and medical resins.

Significance:  Success in this work could lead to a series of antimicrobial medical and dental biomaterials that can prevent secondary caries and infection of implants.


LINK:  http://www.demajournal.com/article/S0109-5641%2810%2900475-6/abstract


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